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Old 04-24-04, 03:40AM   #1
Richard Ohran
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Default What position gives best spray results?

Examples of the "positions" I am talking about are


a) horizontal.... like a hood or a top,

b) vertical ..... like a fender or a door, or

c) anything in between...

From my point of view, the pros of horizontal surface spraying include less chance of a run and the ability to put a heavier coat on the surface. The cons include debris falling off of your gun, hose, clothes, etc. as well as the chance of dragging your hose across your fresh paint, and the possibility of uneven paint application because of the difficulty of controlling the attitude of the gun to the surface.

The cons of vertical in contrast include the greater liklihood of runs and the difficulty of painting low to the floor. The positive aspects of veritical painting are better paint distributiong, and less debris fallout from the air.

I'm asking this question because I just put a rotisserie in my spray booth. I'm considering the following scenario.

a) paint a hood or door vertically or on a slant for more even coverage

b) move it to horizontal or reverse slant if necessary to try to smooth out a run

c) place it in an inverted horizontal position when I am done so that less debris finds it way onto the fresh paint.


Does this seem extreme to anyone? I am a bit of a klutz around the spray booth. Maybe the rest of you aren't having these kind of problems.


Richard
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Old 04-24-04, 04:30PM   #2
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Richard, Marty is the bod man, and he can best answer this quetion.
I check out you web site, very informative information on the garage,
can I ask you were you got the steel covering, or did you buy a kite?
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Old 04-24-04, 08:29PM   #3
Richard Ohran
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Gach,
The ribbed 29 guage steel siding comes pre-painted at a local metal supply here. It came in 10, 12, 14, and 16 foots lengths at my local supply for about 45 cents a square foot the last time I bought it. The paint coating is guaranteed for 30 years, or something like that.

I didn't buy a kit. The entire building is constructed from rectangular steel that comes in 24 foot lengths. I use two sizes: 1.5 x 3 inch .078 thick, and 1.5 inch square .062 thick. In my web site there are detailed sub-pages that show how each of the three buildings was put together.

Richard
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Old 04-25-04, 04:51AM   #4
Marty Phipps
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here's a little known fact to ponder.

Do any of you know which panels cure first on a Complete paint job?

Answer......... The sides.

Reason....... When a panel is painted flat (such as a hood) there's more surface area for solvent saturation... hence it takes longer for the solvents to escape.
Which is also why most solvent popping problems occur on flat panels

When painted sideway's (forget about me talking horizontal/ vertical I always mix em up )
The solvent is immediatly rising, and because it has less (read zero) flat surface area to escape, it dries faster, and of course collects less particle dust, but more chances of runs.

The reason, most painters will paint a car together, of course is time.
Plus there's less of a concern of adjacent panel mis-match from different spray angles, and pressure.
And most important of all..........
Less chance of damaging the part re-assembling it on the car.
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Old 04-25-04, 04:33PM   #5
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Old 04-25-04, 04:46PM   #6
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Marty,
In the previous post I uploaded a picture of how I am planning to use my rotisserie to paint the fenders of my firebird.

As an inexperienced painter, I think this will work better for me. As you say, it will take more time, but then I am doing this as a hobby and not for an income. Getting it right will be better for me. By rotating the work suitably, I think I can keep my spray angle and coverage more uniform. I always seem to get in trouble when I have to get down on my knees and try to spray some part of the car pointing up or sideways. That's usually when I get the spraygun too close and make a run.

I didn't understand your logic on why the vertical surfaces dry faster than the horizontal ones. My guess is because the evaporating solvent vapors are heavier than air and that creates a convection that keeps fresh air running past the painted surface. This would allow the solvent to vaporize faster. If that is true, when I turn these fenders upside down after spraying them, they ought to dry really fast.

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Old 04-26-04, 02:02AM   #7
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Actually...
the solvent vapors are lighter then air.........
But the pigments, and resins that trap them are considerably heavier.
Consequently the vapors travel up wards. so even the bottom of a fender will dry faster then the top of a fender.
Flip the panel upside down.......
You really don't want to go there........ Trust me :0
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Old 04-27-04, 02:27AM   #8
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hmmm.. I can't imagine what it would hurt to rotate the panels to an inverted position. I guess we'll know after the first time. In the worst case, I guess I'd just have to re-shoot a panel.

BTW, I discovered today that shooting a car in sections is not all that bad. After I finished putting a fairly heavy primer coat on the two fender sections, my arms were aching a little from holding the gun out in front of me. I think I'd be wiped out if I had to do the whole car at once. ..... wouldn't it be nice to be younger.

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Old 04-27-04, 02:45AM   #9
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It sure would, I'll take even 10 years younger
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Old 04-27-04, 03:07AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Ohran
hmmm.. I can't imagine what it would hurt to rotate the panels to an inverted position. I guess we'll know after the first time. In the worst case, I guess I'd just have to re-shoot a panel.Richard
think of it this way.
For good flow of materials.
you need at least a medium wet coat for the final spray down.
Personnaly... My final coat is more of a heavy wet application.
paints are made of pigmented colors, resins,binders, solvents, etc.
The paint manufactures actually design the paints to be sprayed a certain way.

Yeah you can get away with flipping the panel upside down if you want.
But what's gonna happen if the color is a metallic finish?
Or if a wet coat causes the binders to "sink" to the surface?
plus there's still the problem of escaping vapors.. much harder for them to escape, if the paint is flipped upside down.

Here's a neat little experiment you can do with a "rattle" can of paint, and 3 or 4 pieces of sheetmetal.
Spray all the pieces at exactly the same time, and amount of material.
For an exaggerated effect, spray them all medium wet, or wet.
Leave 1 piece laying flat, set 1 on it's edge, flip 1 upside down, and set 1 in a can with a lid.
The 1 laying on it's side will dry first, the one laying as sprayed will dry second, the one flipped upside down will dry third, and possibly display signs of seperation, the one in the sealed can might dry someday(for real fun put a couple of drops of water in the can first).

This was a neat little demostration one of the paint suppliers did, back when I was still on the line.

I wouldn't let small particles of dirt scare you.
There's a multitude of products available to "nib" polish these imperfections.
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