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Old 05-19-09, 09:12AM   #1
Zedo
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Default US Post Office faces first layoff in history

things are pretty bad if the post office is laying off

http://www.ksla.com/global/story.asp?s=9247633

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U.S. Postal Service Searching for Ways to Cut Costs

Posted: Oct 27, 2008 06:56 PM

Updated: Nov 21, 2008 11:53 PM
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By Jonathan McCall - bio | email

SHREVEPORT, LA (KSLA) - "We lost 2 billion dollars and like any other business we have to stay afloat." And to keep from sinking, the United States Postal Service is considering cuts. Lavelle Pepper with the post office in Shreveport says they too are feeling the affects of the same disease hitting the country... a struggling economy.

The postal service is offering early retirement packages to workers over the age of 50 who have more than 20 years on the job. U.S.P.S officials released this statement to KSLA News 12 about the news. "Times are tough. Like most businesses in America, the Postal Service must respond to the difficult economy. The Postal Service receives no tax subsidy and when business slows, we must respond by looking for cost savings wherever we can. A number of steps are being taken but Monday's report on Postal workforce reductions was not correct. What we are doing is reducing our workforce by voluntary early retirements. Early retirement has been offered to 156,000 employees nationwide. We anticipate 3 to 5 percent of those employees to accept and apply for voluntary early retirement. We continue to look at all our operations to find ways to reduce costs while maintaining reliable, secure economical mailing services."

The postal service says we were given misinformation on our original story on October 27th...saying nationwide job cuts of 40,000 people is incorrect.


http://www.labornotes.org/node/1947

First-Ever Layoffs Loom at Postal Service
— David Yao

The U.S. Postal Service faces a serious financial shortfall that is accelerating reductions in its workforce and raising the possibility of the first-ever layoffs of career employees.

Reduced mail volume, rising costs, and a newly enacted cap on rate increases all have taken a toll on the Postal Service’s finances. A gradual shift to electronic communications and bill payment is shrinking the number of first-class letters, a mainstay of postal revenues. And the current economic downturn has led to drops in advertising mail volume.

Increasing fuel prices have been a big factor in worsening postal finances, compounded by a legal restriction enacted two years ago against raising the price of most services beyond the rate of inflation. The cap on rate increases was a major victory for the big mailing industry, but combined with rising costs, it has seriously squeezed the postal budget.

Unionized postal workers have not yet experienced layoffs, which have been confined to casual employees, a small percentage of the workforce.

But Postmaster General John Potter, after reporting losses of $2.3 billion in the fiscal year ending September 30, informed the unions that 16,000 craft employees (out of approximately 600,000) are not protected by contractual, seniority-based no-layoff clauses.

The Postal Service is offering early retirement which, based on acceptance rates thus far, will have around 7,000 takers. In early 2009, when the number of early retirees will be known and income can be assessed for the traditionally profitable fourth quarter, there’s a chance that the first layoffs of craft employees may occur.
DAY SHIFT ENDANGERED

Cost pressures are having other effects. Most of the sorting and processing of mail already occurs between 3 p.m. and 6 a.m. But, without notice to the affected unions, postal plant managers have been told to plan for ending day shift operations. If implemented, this would force thousands of clerks (represented by American Postal Workers Union) and mailhandlers (National Postal Mailhandlers Union) out of the more desirable day-shift assignments.

The elimination of daytime jobs would disrupt the family lives and the physical health of those displaced, mostly high-seniority workers. APWU President Bill Burrus has speculated that this action is partly aimed at pushing them to retire.

One proposal to recoup costs would be to ask Congress for an exception to the rate cap, pointing to the cost of fuel. However, one union president has cautioned that too big an increase might further reduce business and drive the shift to e-communication.

The situation may encourage management, or the U.S. government, to push for more subcontracting or privatization, areas of longstanding battles with the unions. For example, the Postal Service recently asked for bids from private companies to outsource work carried out by its network of bulk mail centers. Unions have responded by pushing for favorable legislation, and by pointing out the disagreements on privatization between major-party candidates in the presidential and congressional elections.

Postal workers have been relatively immune from the concessions that have hit other industries. We now face a set of circumstances, termed “a perfect storm” by Burrus, that will challenge the ability of the unions to protect postal jobs, pay, and working conditions.

David Yao is vice president of the Greater Seattle Area Local APWU.
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Old 05-19-09, 04:57PM   #2
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Default sorry for the interruption

Hey Zedo, You still got that 9786133 400 block and stuff? call me toll free 866-491-3652
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Old 05-19-09, 07:16PM   #3
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Hey Zedo, You still got that 9786133 400 block and stuff? call me toll free 866-491-3652


if you mean the 1967 400 2bbl 2 bolt main block- yes- I still have it
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Old 05-20-09, 06:33PM   #4
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Hm do you got a job zedo? Or are you the greatest copycat around?

Me think u should not worry to much , go play with your pontiacs instead.
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Old 05-20-09, 10:52PM   #5
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I'm not understanding the early retirement thing saving money. They now pay someone to sit at home and do nothing for slightly less than they made while working? Maybe they save some worker's comp, uniform costs, etc.?

When they re-ire, they hire for less than the retired one was making, but both reduced salaries add up to more than the original salary?

Maybe they should add on to their business by offering chewing gum, magazines, tents, etc like Autozone does
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Old 05-21-09, 10:44AM   #6
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Originally Posted by INJUNTOM View Post
I'm not understanding the early retirement thing saving money. They now pay someone to sit at home and do nothing for slightly less than they made while working? Maybe they save some worker's comp, uniform costs, etc.?

When they re-ire, they hire for less than the retired one was making, but both reduced salaries add up to more than the original salary?

Maybe they should add on to their business by offering chewing gum, magazines, tents, etc like Autozone does


they no longer have to pay sick time, holidays, personal time, vacation pay, all the benefits, and pension is much less than salary. The new employee comes in at 1/2 the price of the old employee, roughly. The old employee then dies, and the pension stops too. Now they have a new employee for cheaper

it's a long range plan, but it does have immediate savings as well

also production goes up with the new younger employee, and they add tasks to their workload

but that's not the main point- being the US Post Office has shown a decrease in business as well, and is suffering financial losses
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Old 05-21-09, 11:18AM   #7
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Hm do you got a job zedo? Or are you the greatest copycat around?

Me think u should not worry to much , go play with your pontiacs instead.

you got a job working for somene else, Roar ? you should start your own business- you'll have more free time, and make more money

you confuse worry and copycat with political awareness. you have no clue.

love of country and freedom, is more important that playing with Pontiacs- get your priorities straight
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Old 05-21-09, 07:14PM   #8
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Zedo me no clue? I will give you a clue. Lazy people hang out on the internet and post rubbish like you do.Hey hey wake up time to do some real work.

Me work 16 hrs a day, go fiogure if I am hired or not.


So please try to put that together witrh bad economy and shops closing.

So as I said go out and play with your Pontiacs, other people will take care of the econnomy.
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Old 05-21-09, 07:34PM   #9
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Originally Posted by INJUNTOM View Post
I'm not understanding the early retirement thing saving money. They now pay someone to sit at home and do nothing for slightly less than they made while working? Maybe they save some worker's comp, uniform costs, etc.?

When they re-ire, they hire for less than the retired one was making, but both reduced salaries add up to more than the original salary?

Tom- there's more savings too- after the retire the employee, the company, in this case USPS, no longer has to match or pay in unemployment insurance, FICA, Medicare, SSI, workmens comp insurance, etc.

The company ends up saving a $hitload of money- usually whoever is left still working at the company after a big downsize, all get raises, as a method of keeping moral up with remaining employees.
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